JUICEFLY ALCOHOL & VAPE DELIVERY IN LOS ANGELES
What Is Skin Contact Wine?

What Is Skin Contact Wine?

It's the same delicious wine whether you call it orange, skin contact, or amber wine. But if you are learning about orange wine for the first time, we need to go into more detail. First of all, no, oranges aren't used to make orange wine. In fact, orange wine or skin contact wine has nothing to do with oranges, other than the fact that they are both kinds of the same color.

History and tradition of skin contact wine

Skin-contact wine is basically white wine that has turned orange because the grape juice was left in contact with the grape skins for a few days to a year, and that is extreme even by red wine standards. This makes the wine more full-bodied and tannic, and it gives the color more depth, going from pale gold to deep bronze. How long the skin is in contact with the dye makes a huge difference in how the dye turns out. It's just starting to become popular in the wine world, but it's been around for more than 8,000 years. Some people call it Georgian wine because Georgians are thought to be the first people to make wine and because the country is thought to be where skin-contact wine was first made.

It has a deliciously complex mix of tastes.

Because of how it was made, the wine can taste like red wine. It has the tannins, body, texture, and depth of a real red wine. But because white wine grapes are used to make the wine, it has the fruity taste and smell of white wine. So, always be ready for a taste explosion. You will also be glad to have a low-histamine wine on hand if you like natural wines. Don't forget to try these wines.

It has a special color that ranges from light yellow to a deep amber-like tone

It is thought that compounds in the skin, like carotenoids, which are also found in carrots, and flavonoid-type phenols, give the skin-contact wines their color. Orange wine is also called amber wine because of its color.

Skin contact wine and rose wine are not the same

Skin contact wine is not the same as rosé wine, even though they are made in a similar way. When making rosé wine, the skins of red grapes are allowed to slightly stain the grape juice. When making orange wine, the skins of white wine grapes are allowed to slightly stain the white grape juice.

And while it's not a good idea to keep the grape skins in contact with the grape juice when making white wine, this is what makes skin-contact wine stand out because it goes against the grain, which is exactly what's needed to make this special drink.

What makes orange wine worth trying?

Orange wine is becoming a popular alternative to white wine very quickly. It's a very versatile product, and we've seen that people are buying it very quickly. A lot of people could look down on it. So many different countries are now trying out these techniques for making wine. You can try them yourself by ordering a great bottle from Juicefly. Here are some of the great skin contact wines you can order now in Los Angeles.

KLET BRDA KRASNO

This skin contact wine has a faint whiff of pear that quickly dissipates. The body is medium, the wine is dry, and it has a hint of citrus, along with decent leanness and acidity.

CONSTANTINA SOTELO OCTOPUS ALBARIÑO

Octopus is an unoaked Albarino that has matured in amphora with skin contact technique and no sulfites. The peels were allowed to macerate while the wine was swirled three times a day to promote spontaneous fermentation. With the skins removed, the wine is matured in a cylindrical clay amphora with regular batonnage. 50-year-old trellised vines were hand-picked from a family allotment located just a mile from the coast. With no sulfites or filtration added, this wine is truly natural.

 

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